Maintenance, Mechanics, Skilled Trades And Warehouse Salary and Compensation Survey Benchmark Job Descriptions
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CompGeo Trades and Related Occupation Group Benchmark Job Descriptions
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Job Family: Helpers
Benchmark Title: Helpers, Brick and Stonemasons and Hard Tile Setters
Helpers--Brickmasons, Blockmasons, Stonemasons, and Tile and Marble Setters help
brickmasons, blockmasons, stonemasons, or tile and marble setters by performing duties of lesser skill. Duties
include using, supplying or holding materials or tools, and cleaning work area and equipment. Excludes apprentice
workers and report them with the appropriate skilled construction trade occupation and also excludes construction
laborers who do not primarily assist brickmasons, blockmasons, and stonemasons or tile and marble setters.
 
Benchmark Title: Helpers, Carpenters and Related Workers
Helpers--Carpenters help carpenters by performing duties of lesser skill. Duties
include using, supplying or holding materials or tools, and cleaning work area and equipment. Excludes apprentice
workers and construction laborers who do not primarily assist carpenters.
 
Benchmark Title: Helpers, Electricians
Helpers--Electricians help electricians by performing duties of lesser skill. Duties include using, supplying or
holding materials or tools, and cleaning work area and equipment. Excludes apprentice workers and construction
laborers who do not primarily assist electricians.
 
Benchmark Title: Helpers, Installation, Maintenance and Repair
Helpers--Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Workersh elp installation, maintenance, and repair workers in
maintenance, parts replacement, and repair of vehicles, industrial machinery, and electrical and electronic
equipment. Perform duties, such as furnishing tools, materials, and supplies to other workers; cleaning work area,
machines, and tools; and holding materials or tools for other workers.
 
Benchmark Title: Helpers, Painters, Paperhangers, Plasterers
Helpers--Painters, Paperhangers, Plasterers, and Stucco Masons help painters, paperhangers, plasterers, or stucco
masons by performing duties of lesser skill. Duties include using, supplying or holding materials or tools, and
cleaning work area and equipment. Excludes apprentice workers and construction laborers who do not primarily assist
painters, paperhangers, plasterers, or stucco masons.
 
Benchmark Title: Helpers, Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters
Helpers--Pipelayers, Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters help plumbers, pipefitters, steamfitters, or
pipelayers by performing duties of lesser skill. Duties include using, supplying or holding materials or tools, and
cleaning work area and equipment. Excludes apprentice workers and construction laborers who do not primarily assist
plumbers, pipefitters, steamfitters, or pipelayers.
 
Benchmark Title: Helpers, Roofers
Helpers--Roofers help roofers by performing duties of lesser skill. Duties include using, supplying or holding
materials or tools, and cleaning work area and equipment. Excludes apprentice workers and construction laborers who
do not primarily assist roofers.
 
 
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Job Family: Maintenance
Benchmark Title: Electronic Equipment Installers/Repairers Motor Vehicle
Electronic Equipment Installers and Repairers, Motor Vehicles install, diagnose,
or repair communications, sound, security, or navigation equipment in motor vehicles.
 
Benchmark Title: General Maintenance Worker I
General Maintenance Worker I performs routine maintenance and repair using basic
skills and knowledge of craft trades. Work typically includes a variety of the following or equivalent duties:
Replacing electrical receptacles, switches, fixtures, wires, and motors; using plaster or compound to patch minor
holes and cracks in walls and ceilings; repairing sinks, water coolers, and toilets; painting structures and
equipment; repairing concrete floors, steps, and sidewalks; replacing damaged paneling and floor tiles; hanging
doors and installing door locks; replacing broken window panes; and performing scheduled maintenance and making
simple repairs on equipment and machinery.
 
Benchmark Title: General Maintenance Worker II
General Maintenance Worker II performs moderately difficult maintenance and repair work using skills and knowledge
of craft trades and some specialized hand or power-tools. Work requires most of the following: Interpreting simple
blueprints, manufacturersĂ manuals, or similar documents; determining methods and materials to be used in
completing assignments; making standard shop calculations; prioritizing requests; and responding to emergencies.
In addition to the duties described for General Maintenance Worker I, work typically includes a variety of the
following or equivalent duties:
 
Benchmark Title: General Maintenance Workers
General maintenance and repair workers, however, have skills in many different crafts. They repair and maintain
machines, mechanical equipment, and buildings and work on plumbing, electrical, and air-conditioning and heating
systems. They build partitions, make plaster or drywall repairs, and fix or paint roofs, windows, doors, floors,
woodwork, and other parts of building structures. They also maintain and repair specialized equipment and machinery
found in cafeterias, laundries, hospitals, stores, offices, and factories. Typical duties include troubleshooting
and fixing faulty electrical switches, repairing air-conditioning motors, and unclogging drains
 
Benchmark Title: Industrial Machinery Mechanics
Industrial Machinery Mechanics repair, install, adjust, or maintain industrial production and processing machinery
or refinery and pipeline distribution systems. Industrial Machinery Mechanics confer with operators and observes,
tests, and evaluates operation of machinery and equipment to diagnose cause of malfunction, disassemble machinery
and equipment to remove parts and make repairs, repair, replace, adjust, align components of machinery and
equipment, fabricate replacement parts and test-run repaired machinery and equipment to verify adequacy of repairs
and enter codes and instructions to program computer-controlled machinery.
 
Benchmark Title: Machinery Maintenance Workers
Refractory Materials Repairers, Except Brickmasons build or repair furnaces, kilns, cupolas, boilers, converters,
ladles, soaking pits, ovens, etc., using refractory materials.
Maintenance Workers, Machinery lubricate machinery, change parts, or perform other routine machinery maintenance.
Excludes Maintenance and Repair Workers, General.
 
 
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Benchmark Title: Maintenance Machinist
Machinists - industrial machinery repairerers produce replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of metal
parts of mechanical equipment. Work involves most of the following: 1. Interpreting written instructions and
specifications; 2. Planning and laying out of work; 3. Using a variety of machinistĂs handtools and precision
measuring instruments; 4. Setting up and operating standard machine tools; 5. Shaping of metal parts to close
tolerances; 6. Making standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work, tooling, feeds, and speeds of
machining; 7. Knowledge of the working properties of the common metals; 8. Selecting standard materials, parts, and
equipment required for this work; and 9. Fitting and assembling parts into mechanical equipment. In general, the
machinistĂs work normally requires a rounded training in machine-shop practice usually acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
 
Benchmark Title: Motorboat Mechanics
Motorboat mechanics, or marine equipment mechanics, repair and adjust the electrical and mechanical equipment of
inboard and outboard boat engines. Most small boats have portable outboard engines that are removed and brought
into the repair shop. Larger craft, such as cabin cruisers and commercial fishing boats, are powered by diesel or
gasoline inboard or inboard-outboard engines, which are removed only for major overhauls. Most of these repairs are
performed at the docks or marinas. Motorboat mechanics also may work on propellers, steering mechanisms, marine
plumbing, and other boat equipment.
 
Benchmark Title: Motorcycle Mechanics
Motorcycle mechanics repair and overhaul motorcycles, motor scooters, mopeds, dirt bikes, and all-terrain vehicles.
Besides repairing engines, they may work on transmissions, brakes, and ignition systems and make minor body
repairs. Mechanics usually specialize in the service and repair of one type of equipment, although they may work on
closely related products. Mechanics may service just a few makes and models of motorcycles, because dealers usually
service only the products they sell.
 
Benchmark Title: Outdoor Power Equipment and Other Small Engine Mechanics
Outdoor power equipment and other small engine mechanics service and repair outdoor power equipment, such as
lawnmowers, garden tractors, edge trimmers, and chain saws. They also may occasionally work on portable generators
and gocarts. In addition, small engine mechanics in northern parts of the country may work on snowblowers and
snowmobiles, but demand for this type of repair is seasonal.
 
Benchmark Title: Recreational Vehicle Service Technicians
Recreational Vehicle Service Technicians diagnose, inspect, adjust, repair, or overhaul recreational vehicles
including travel trailers. May specialize in maintaining gas, electrical, hydraulic, plumbing, or chassis/towing
systems as well as repairing generators, appliances, and interior components. Includes workers who perform
customized van conversions. Excludes automotive service technicians and mechanics, and bus and truck mechanics and
diesel engine specialists who also work on recreation vehicles.
 
 
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Benchmark Title: Stationary Engineers
Stationary Engineers operate and maintain stationary engines and mechanical equipment to provide utilities for
buildings or industrial processes. Operate equipment such as steam engines, generators, motors, turbines, and steam
boilers. Stationary engineers typically use computers to operate the mechanical, electrical, and fire safety
systems of new buildings and plants. Engineers monitor, adjust, and diagnose these systems from a central location,
using a computer linked into the buildingsĂ communications network. The International Union of Operating Engineers
sponsors apprenticeship programs and is the principal union for Stationary engineers and boiler operators. An
apprenticeship usually lasts 4 years and includes 8,000 hours of on-the-job training.
 
Benchmark Title: Stationary Engineers and Boiler Operators
Stationary engineers and boiler operators start up, regulate, repair, and shut down equipment. They ensure that the
equipment operates safely, economically, and within established limits by monitoring meters, gauges, and
computerized controls. Stationary engineers and boiler operators control equipment manually and, if necessary, make
adjustments. They also record relevant events and facts concerning the operation and maintenance of the equipment
in a log. With regard to steam boilers, for example, they observe, control, and record the steam pressure,
temperature, water level, chemistry, power output, fuel consumption, and emissions from the vessel.
 
 
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Job Family: Maintenance Electronics
Benchmark Title: Electric Motor, Transformer, and Related Repairers
Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers repair, maintain, or install electric motors, wiring, or
switches. This benchmark represents a group of specific occupations, namely, Electric Home Appliance and Power
Tool Repairers, Electric Motor and Switch Assemblers and Repairers, Battery Repairers, Transformer Repairers,
Electrical Parts Reconditioners and Hand and Portable Power Tool Repairers
 
Benchmark Title: Electrical/Electronics Installers/Repairers Transportation
Electrical and Electronics Installers and Repairers, Transportation Equipment install, adjust, or maintain mobile
electronics communication equipment, including sound, sonar, security, navigation, and surveillance systems on
trains, watercraft, or other mobile equipment.
 
Benchmark Title: Electronics Repairers, Commercial/Industrial Equipment
Electrical and Electronics Repairers, Commercial and Industrial Equipment repair, test, adjust, or install
electronic equipment, such as industrial controls, transmitters, and antennas. Included job titles are Industrial
Electrician, Electrician, I&E Tech (Instrument And Electrical Technician), Control Technician, E&I Tech (Electrical
And Instrument Technician), Instrument And Control Tech, Electrical Repairman, Electronic
Mechanic, Hydro Maintenance Tech, Hydro-Plant Tech and Field Service Technician. Installers and repairers,
also known as Field Service Technicians, travel to locations to install and repair equipment. Field Service Technicians
have areas in which they install and perform maintenance, diagnosis and repair. When equipment breaks down,
field technicians go to a customerĺs site to repair equipment. Bench technicians work in repair shops
located in factories and service centers, fixing components that cannot be repaired on the factory floor.
 
Benchmark Title: Maintenance Electronics Tech I
Maintenance Electronics Technician I applies technical knowledge to perform simple or routine tasks following
detailed instructions. electronic equipment; and taking test readings using common instruments such as digital
multimeters, signal generators, semiconductor testers, curve tracers, and oscilloscopes. Receives technical
guidance, as required, from supervisor or higher level technician. Work is spot-checked for accuracy.
 
Benchmark Title: Maintenance Electronics Tech II
Maintenance Electronics Technician II applies comprehensive technical knowledge to solve complex problems by
interpreting manufacturersĂ manuals or similar documents. Work requires familiarity with the interrelationships of
circuits and judgment in planning work sequence and in selecting tools and testing instruments. Receives technical
guidance, as required, from supervisor or higher level technician, and work is reviewed for compliance with
accepted practices. May provide technical guidance to lower level technicians.
 
Benchmark Title: Maintenance Electronics Tech III
Maintenance Electronics Technician III applies advanced technical knowledge to solve unusually complex problems
that typically cannot be solved solely by referencing manufacturersĂ manuals or similar documents. Examples of
such problems include determining the location and density of circuitry, evaluating electromagnetic radiation,
isolating malfunctions, and incorporating engineering changes. Work typically requires a detailed understanding of
the interrelationships of circuits. Exercises independent judgment in performing such tasks as making circuit
analyses, calculating wave forms, and tracing relationships in signal flow. Uses complex test instruments such as
high frequency pulse generators, frequency synthesizers, distortion analyzers, and complex computer control
equipment. Work may be reviewed by supervisor for general compliance with accepted practices. May provide
technical guidance to lower level technicians.
 
 
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Benchmark Title: Radio Mechanics
Radio Mechanics test or repair mobile or stationary radio transmitting and receiving equipment and two-way radio
communications systems used in ship-to-shore communications and found in service and emergency vehicles.
 
 
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Job Family: Mechanics
Benchmark Title: Aircraft Engine Specialists
.
 
Benchmark Title: Aircraft Mechanics
Aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and service technicians perform scheduled maintenance, make repairs, and
complete inspections required by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Many aircraft mechanics, also called
airframe, powerplant, and avionics aviation maintenance technicians, specialize in preventive maintenance. They
inspect engines, landing gear, instruments, pressurized sections, accessories brakes, valves, pumps, and
air-conditioning systems, for example¨and other parts of the aircraft, and do the necessary maintenance and
replacement of parts. Inspections take place following a schedule based on the number of hours the aircraft has
flown, calendar days since the last inspection, cycles of operation, or a combination of these factors.
 
Benchmark Title: Automotive Body and Related Repairers
Automotive body repairers straighten bent bodies, remove dents, and replace crumpled parts that cannot be fixed.
They repair all types of vehicles, but work mostly on cars and small trucks, although some work on large trucks,
buses, or tractor-trailers. Automotive body repairers use special equipment to restore damaged metal frames and
body sections. Repairers chain or clamp frames and sections to alignment machines that use hydraulic pressure to
align damaged components. Unibody vehicles designs built without frames must be restored to precise factory
specifications for the vehicle to operate correctly.
 
Benchmark Title: Automotive Glass Installers and Repairers
Automotive glass installers and repairers remove broken, cracked, or pitted windshields and window glass. Glass
installers apply a moisture-proofing compound along the edges of the glass, place the glass in the vehicle, and
install rubber strips around the sides of the windshield or window to make it secure and weatherproof.
 
Benchmark Title: Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics
Automotive service technicians and mechanics diagnose the source of automotive problems requiring good reasoning
ability and a thorough knowledge of automobiles. Many technicians consider diagnosing hard-to-find troubles one of
their most challenging and satisfying duties. The work of automotive service technicians and mechanics has evolved
from mechanical repair to a high technology job. Today, integrated electronic systems and complex computers run
vehicles and measure their performance while on the road. Technicians must have an increasingly broad base of
knowledge about how vehiclesĂ complex components work and interact, as well as the ability to work with electronic
diagnostic equipment and computer-based technical reference materials.
 
Benchmark Title: Avionics Technician
Avionics Technicians install, inspect, test, adjust, or repair avionics equipment, such as radar, radio,
navigation, and missile control systems in aircraft or space vehicles.
 
 
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Benchmark Title: Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine Specialists
Diesel service technicians and mechanics, also known as bus and truck mechanics and diesel engine specialists,
repair and maintain the diesel engines that power transportation equipment such as heavy trucks, buses, and
locomotives. Some diesel technicians and mechanics also work on heavy vehicles and mobile equipment, including
bulldozers, cranes, road graders, farm tractors, and combines. A small number of technicians repair diesel-powered
passenger automobiles, light trucks, or boats.
 
Benchmark Title: Farm Equipment Mechanics
Farm equipment mechanics service, maintain, and repair farm equipment, as well as smaller lawn and garden tractors
sold to suburban homeowners. What typically was a general repairerĂs job around the farm has evolved into a
specialized technical career. Farmers have increasingly turned to farm equipment dealers to service and repair
their equipment because the machinery has grown in complexity. Modern equipment uses more electronics and
hydraulics, making it difficult to perform repairs without some specialized training.
 
Benchmark Title: Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics, Except Engines
Mobile heavy equipment mechanics and service technicians keep construction and surface mining equipment, such as
bulldozers, cranes, crawlers, draglines, graders, excavators, and other equipment, in working order. Typically,
these workers are employed by equipment wholesale distribution and leasing firms, large construction and mining
companies, local and Federal governments, and other organizations operating and maintaining heavy machinery and
equipment fleets. Service technicians employed by the Federal Government may work on tanks and other armored
equipment.
 
 
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Job Family: Skilled Trades
Benchmark Title: Electricians
Electricians install, connect, test, and maintain electrical systems for a variety of purposes, including climate
control, security, and communications. They also may install and maintain the electronic controls for machines in
business and industry. Although most electricians specialize in construction or maintenance, a growing number do
both. Electricians work with blueprints when they install electrical systems in factories, office buildings,
homes, and other structures. Blueprints indicate the locations of circuits, outlets, load centers, panel boards,
and other equipment. Electricians must follow the National Electric Code and comply with State and local building
codes when they install these systems. In factories and offices, they first place conduit (pipe or tubing) inside
designated partitions, walls, or other concealed areas.
 
 
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Job Family: Tool Room
Benchmark Title: Tool And Die Maker
Analyze a variety of specifications, layout metal stock, set up and operate machine tools, and fit and assemble
parts to make and repair metal working dies, cutting tools, jigs, fixtures, gauges and machinists' hand tools.
 
 
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Job Family: Trades - Journey Level
Benchmark Title: Brickmasons and Blockmasons
Brickmasons, blockmasons, and stonemasons work in closely related trades creating attractive, durable surfaces and
structures. The work varies in complexity, from laying a simple masonry walkway to installing an ornate exterior on
a highrise building. Brickmasons and blockmasons¨who often are called simply bricklayers build and repair walls,
floors, partitions, fireplaces, chimneys, and other structures with brick, precast masonry panels, concrete block,
and other masonry materials. Some brickmasons specialize in installing firebrick linings in industrial furnaces.
Stonemasons build stone walls, as well as set stone exteriors and floors. They work with two types of stone natural
cut stone, such as marble, granite, and limestone; and artificial stone made from concrete, marble chips, or other
masonry materials. Stonemasons usually work on nonresidential structures, such as houses of worship, hotels, and
office buildings.
 
Benchmark Title: Carpenters
Carpenters are involved in many different kinds of construction activity. They cut, fit, and assemble wood and
other materials for the construction of buildings, highways, bridges, docks, industrial plants, boats, and many
other structures. CarpentersĂ duties vary by type of employer. Builders increasingly are using specialty trade
contractors who, in turn, hire carpenters who specialize in just one or two activities. Such activities include
setting forms for concrete construction; erecting scaffolding; or doing finishing work, such as installing interior
and exterior trim. However, a carpenter directly employed by a general building contractor often must perform a
variety of the tasks associated with new construction, such as framing walls and partitions, putting in doors and
windows, building stairs, laying hardwood floors, and hanging kitchen cabinets.
 
Benchmark Title: Elevator Installers and Repairers
Elevator installers and repairers also called elevator constructors or elevator mechanics¨assemble, install, and
replace elevators, escalators, dumbwaiters, moving walkways, and similar equipment in new and old buildings. Once
the equipment is in service, they maintain and repair it as well. They also are responsible for modernizing older
equipment. To install, repair, and maintain modern elevators, which are almost all electronically controlled,
elevator installers and repairers must have a thorough knowledge of electronics, electricity, and hydraulics.
 
Benchmark Title: Heating/Air Conditioning/Refrigeration Mechanics
Heating and air-conditioning mechanics install, service, and repair heating and air-conditioning systems in both
residences and commercial establishments. Furnace installers, also called heating equipment technicians, follow
blueprints or other specifications to install oil, gas, electric, solid-fuel, and multiple-fuel heating systems.
Air-conditioning mechanics install and service central air-conditioning systems. After putting the equipment in
place, they install fuel and water supply lines, air ducts and vents, pumps, and other components. They may connect
electrical wiring and controls and check the unit for proper operation. To ensure the proper functioning of the
system, furnace installers often use combustion test equipment, such as carbon dioxide and oxygen testers.
 
Benchmark Title: Mechanical Door Repairers
Mechanical door repairers install, service, or repair opening and closing mechanisms of automatic doors and
hydraulic door closers. Includes garage door mechanics.
 
 
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Benchmark Title: Operating Engineers
Operating engineers and other construction equipment operators operate one or several types of power construction
equipment. They may operate excavation and loading machines equipped with scoops, shovels, or buckets that dig
sand, gravel, earth, or similar materials and load it into trucks or onto conveyors. In addition to the familiar
bulldozers, they operate trench excavators, road graders, and similar equipment. Sometimes, they may drive and
control industrial trucks or tractors equipped with forklifts or booms for lifting materials or with hitches for
pulling trailers. They also may operate and maintain air compressors, pumps, and other power equipment at
construction sites. Construction equipment operators who are classified as operating engineers are capable of
operating several different types of construction equipment.
 
Benchmark Title: Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters
Plumbers install and repair the water, waste disposal, drainage, and gas systems
in homes and commercial and industrial buildings. Plumbers also install plumbing fixtures¨bathtubs, showers, sinks,
and toilets¨and appliances such as dishwashers and water heaters. Pipefitters install and repair both high- and
low-pressure pipe systems used in manufacturing, in the generation of electricity, and in heating and cooling
buildings. They also install automatic controls that are increasingly being used to regulate these systems. Some
pipefitters specialize in only one type of system. Steamfitters, for example, install pipe systems that move
liquids or gases under high pressure.
 
Benchmark Title: Stonemasons
Stonemasons build stone walls, as well as set stone exteriors and floors. They work with two types of stone¨natural
cut stone, such as marble, granite, and limestone; and artificial stone made from concrete, marble chips, or other
masonry materials. Stonemasons usually work on nonresidential structures, such as houses of worship, hotels, and
office buildings.
 
 
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Job Family: Warehouse & Related
Benchmark Title: Manager, Storage and Distribution
Storage and Distribution Managers plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities
in accordance with governmental policies and regulations. Include logistics managers.
 
Benchmark Title: Material Handling Laborer
Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand manually move freight, stock, or other materials or perform
other unskilled general labor. Includes all unskilled manual laborers not elsewhere classified.
 
Benchmark Title: Material Movement and Storage Workers II
Material Movement and Storage Worker II performs duties in one or more broad areas of responsibility requiring
knowledge of the general storage layout and procedures, or skill in storing and retrieving materials. As directed,
primarily functions as one of the following: 1. Forklift Operator - Industrial truck and tractor equipment
operator). Moves goods and materials within a warehouse, factory, yard, loading dock, or storage area by forklift;
2. Shipping/Receiving Clerk - Shipping - Verifies that orders are accurately filled by comparing items and
quantities of goods gathered for shipment against documents; insures that shipments are properly packaged,
identified with shipping information, and loaded into transporting vehicles; and prepares and keeps records of
goods shipped, for example, manifests and bills of lading; AND/OR Receiving - Verifies the correctness of incoming
shipments by comparing items and quantities unloaded against bills of lading, invoices, manifests, storage
receipts, or other records; checks for damaged goods; insures that goods are appropriately identified for routing
to departments within the establishment; and prepares and keeps records of goods received.
 
Benchmark Title: Material Movement and Storage Workers III
Material Movement and Storage Worker III independently performs duties in one or
more broad areas or responsibility requiring little or no supervision. In addition to the duties and
responsibilities described for level II, work involves most of the following: Determines how to best organize and
arrange stock within the general storage plan; decides which location is most suitable for assembling shipments;
when to shift, consolidate, and arrange items; and the sequence of steps, methods, and procedures to complete
assignments in a timely manner. May direct and coordinate the activities of other workers engaged in handling goods
or materials.
 
Benchmark Title: Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerks
Shipping, receiving, and traffic clerks keep records of all goods shipped and received. Their duties depend on the
size of the establishment and the level of automation used. Larger companies typically are better able to finance
the purchase of computers and other equipment to handle some or all of a clerkĂs responsibilities. In smaller
companies, a clerk maintains records, prepares shipments, and accepts deliveries. In both environments, shipping,
receiving, and traffic clerks may lift cartons of various sizes.
 
 
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